Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes

Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes

An indulgent breakfast treat

Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes are citrusy-spiced fruit buns that are glazed with sticky orange marmalade.

Toast a teacake, slather it with butter and eat it with a steaming mug of tea. These orange-flavoured teacakes are great for an indulgent morning tea or a decadent breakfast.

The teacakes are freezer-friendly so I recommend that you make them during an evening midweek so that you can then take one out of the freezer to enjoy for breakfast at the weekend.

Citrus-flavoured yeast buns

This teacakes recipe is inspired by classic English teacakes that are large, flat, circular, fruit buns that are normally split in half, toasted and buttered.

My version produces teacakes that are a bit smaller and more domed in shape. I use fragrant orange zest in this recipe to give a beautiful citrus taste.

Instead of using normal black tea to infuse the dried fruit, I use Australian lemon myrtle tea that gives a light lemon flavour to the teacakes. Mixed spice and nutmeg makes these baked goodies taste similar to hot cross buns but their sticky orange marmalade glaze makes them even more delicious.

You should make these teacakes because they are:

  • Sticky, orange-flavoured fruit buns that taste amazing!
  • Freezer-friendly: freeze the teacakes before glazing.
  • Budget-friendly: inexpensive store-cupboard ingredients like flour and dried fruit make up the recipe base.

Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes’ main ingredients:

  • Lemon myrtle tea
  • Mixed dried fruit
  • Strong white bread flour
  • Mixed spice
  • Orange marmalade
Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes with butter, marmalade and a cup of tea
Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes for breakfast

Tips for busy cooks

If you can’t get lemon myrtle tea, you could use lemon balm or Earl Grey tea instead.

Use any mixed dried fruit combination that you prefer. I use a dried fruit mix that has orange and lemon peel in it that enhances the teacakes’ citrus flavour.

Serving suggestions:

  1. Weekend breakfast: eat one of these teacakes with a cup of coffee.
  2. Morning or afternoon tea: enjoy a teacake with a cup of tea for a decadent snack.

Home-baked goodies for brekkie!

Make my orange and lemon myrtle teacakes and fill your home with delicious, uplifting baking aromas that will make your stomach grumble with hunger.

There is nothing better than freshly baked treats for breakfast or for morning tea.

This teacakes recipe is so good that you will be tempted to make a larger batch next time you bake them.

Did you use lemon myrtle tea in this recipe or did you use another type of tea?

Let me know by leaving a comment and a recipe rating below – I’d love to hear from you.

Have you made this recipe? Tag @vegcoastcook on Instagram or use the hashtag #vegcoastcook so that I can see!

If you like using tea and citrus in your baking, try this recipe next: Earl Grey and lemon shortbread

Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes

Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes are citrusy-spiced fruit buns that are glazed with orange marmalade. An indulgent morning tea or a decadent breakfast.
Meal Type Afternoon tea, Breakfast, Snacks
Cuisine British-Inspired
Keyword Orange and lemon myrtle teacakes, Vegetarian
Dough proving 2 hours 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 6 Teacakes
Author Veg Coast Cook

Ingredients

Dried fruit and tea infusion

  • 2 tsp lemon myrtle loose tea * see Recipe Notes
  • 150 g mixed dried fruit

Milk and butter mixture

  • 100 ml skimmed milk
  • 40 g unsalted butter
  • 90 ml cold water

Dough

  • 350 g strong white bread flour
  • 2 tbsp caster sugar
  • 7 g sachet fast action dried yeast
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • ½ tsp nutmeg
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 large orange zest only - finely grated
  • Rice bran oil for greasing

Glaze

  • 2 tbsp orange marmalade

Instructions

  1. Dried fruit and tea infusion: Stir dried fruit into cooled tea infusion, leave to steep for 15 minutes in a small bowl.
  2. Milk and butter mixture: Gently warm the milk and butter in small saucepan over a low heat. Stir in 90 ml of cold water once the butter has fully melted.
  3. Dough: Sift flour, mixed spice and nutmeg into a large mixing bowl. Add yeast and sugar to one side of the bowl. Add salt opposite yeast in the bowl. Make a well in flour mixture and pour in milk & melted butter. If the dough is too dry, gradually add a small amount of the tea liquid to it as well. Mix with a wooden spoon until the mixture starts to come together. 

    Tip the dough onto a kitchen work surface and knead for 10 minutes. Put dough into a large greased bowl and cover with oiled clingfilm. Leave in a warm place for about 1 ½ hours or until doubled in size.

  4. Drain tea from steeped mixed fruit so you are left with fruit only and no liquid. Combine steeped fruit with orange zest. Knead fruit and zest into dough until combined. 


    Divide dough into six evenly sized pieces and form into balls. On a large baking tray (that has been lined with greaseproof paper) place each of the six balls of dough with a gap between each of them and slightly flatten each ball with the palm of your hand. Cover with oiled clingfilm and leave in a warm place for 1 hour.

  5. Preheat oven to 180°C fan. Remove oiled clingfilm and bake teacakes in the oven for 25 minutes until they have risen and are lightly golden in colour. Remove from oven and put onto wire rack.

  6. Glaze: Gently warm orange marmalade in a small saucepan over a low heat until runny. Remove from heat. Using a pastry brush glaze the top of the warm teacakes with runny marmalade and allow them to cool.
  7. To serve: Slice a teacake in half, toast the non-glazed sides and spread with softened butter.

Recipe Notes

*Lemon myrtle tea: steep tea in 200 ml hot water for 10 minutes, strain and discard tea leaves and reserve liquid.  Allow to cool.

Made this recipe? Tag @vegcoastcook on Instagram or use the hashtag #vegcoastcook



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *






This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.